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Imagination & religion in Anglo-Irish literature 1930-1980 by D. Murphy

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Published by Irish Academic in Dublin .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • English literature -- Irish authors -- History and criticism,
  • English literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementDaniel Murphy
The Physical Object
Pagination228 p. ;
Number of Pages228
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16693326M
ISBN 100716524007
LC Control Number87026372

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Daniel Murphy: Imagination and Religion in Anglo-Irish Literature RICHARD PINE Richard Ellmann: Oscar Wilde NUALA Ní DHOMHNAILL Ciarán Carson: The Irish for No GILLIAN RUSSELL Kevin Rockett, Luke Gibbons, John Hill: Cinema and Ireland PETER DENMAN MP Hederman & R. Kearney (eds): The Crane Bag Book of Irish 5/5(1). Daniel Murphy: Imagination and Religion in Anglo-Irish Literature RICHARD PINE Richard Ellmann: Oscar Wilde NUALA Ní DHOMHNAILL Ciarán Carson: The Irish for No GILLIAN RUSSELL Kevin Rockett, Luke Gibbons, John Hill: Cinema and Ireland PETER DENMAN MP Hederman & R. Kearney (eds): The Crane Bag Book of Irish. The works of many Anglo-Irish writers are familiar to us. English literature has often been dominated by Irish writers who wrote in English. In this highly entertaining and informative book, Professor Jeffares surveys the whole range of one of the richest literary traditions from its beginnings in the Middle Ages to the modern period. Irish writing has been influenced by religion from the beginning; indeed it was the arrival of Christianity which brought Latin orthography, which men of learning adopted. Pagan beliefs were assimilated into Christianity, but not entirely so: a theme which is dealt with in the essay on writing in early Ireland. The relationship between the various Irish Churches and writers in the 18th and.

  The Anglo-Irish literary renaissance that flowered between Edmund Burke's last years and the generation of Yeats and Joyce had close ties to European Romanticism and was a critical force in the development of modernist literature in the origins of Protestant Ascendancy ideology in the alarm of the 's, McCormack traces its cultural significance through an examination of a number of central Reviews: 1. ANGLO-IRISH LITERATURE Daniel Murphy, Imagination and Religion in Anglo-Irish () «examines the place of religion and of the nature and scope of religious themes and influences» in the writers of this period.   JOHN HEWITT was a poet who took considerable solace and satisfaction from the Glens of Antrim in Northern Ireland. The beauty and serenity of this impressive landscape stirred his imagination and inspired him to produce many collections of engaging and thought-provoking verse.   Marianne Elliott is director of the Institute of Irish Studies at Liverpool University and author of Catholics of Ulster: a History and Wolfe Tone: Prophet of Irish Independence, which won the.

This book follows Kearney’s journey through the fields of philosophy of the imagination, hermeneutics, philosophy of religion, ethics, psychology, practical philosophy, and politics. The selection of writings in this volume offers to the specialist and the general reader a concise, well-rounded entry into one of the most prolific and wide. Irish literature - Irish literature - The Irishness of Anglo-Irish literature: Swift demonstrated no interest in the “barbarous” Irish language and, unlike Burke, no sympathy for poor Irish Roman Catholics. Swift’s views were an expression of his own bifurcated vision of Irish writing. According to such a view, 18th-century Ireland produced two distinct literatures that never touched or. Notes on the Contributors. Terence Brown is Professor Emeritus of Anglo-Irish Literature at Trinity College Dublin. He has published widely on Irish literary and cultural history: Northern Voices: Poets from Ulster and Louis Mac-Neice: Sceptical Vision (both ), Ireland: A Social and Cultural History (3rd ed., ) and The Literature of Ireland: Culture and Criticism (). The Anglo-Irish produce a haunting, memorable body of writings that explore a unique yet always Irish identity and destiny. Moynahan's exploration of the literature reveals women writers—Maria Edgeworth, Edith Somerville, Martin Ross, and Elizabeth Bowen—as a generative and major force in the development of this literary imagination.